Structural failure: Why Greece's reception system failed to provide sustainable solutions

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Τρίτη, 18 Ιουνίου 2019
Structural failure: Why Greece's reception system failed to provide sustainable solutions

Author: RSA & PRO ASYL | 18 June 2019

As of early summer 2019, the so-called refugee crisis in Greece has been shaped entirely through the status quo put in place by the EU-Turkey Statement of March 2016. The reality on the ground is mostly a policy-made humanitarian crisis on the Greek island’s hot-spots, the Evros Reception and Identification Center (RIC) as well as several of the camps hosting refugees in the mainland. Conditions vary from place to place and show a patchwork approach towards addressing the serious issues that exist in the reception system for refugees and asylum-seekers than a well-constructed mechanism.
On June 6th 2019, there were 16,108 refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants stranded on the Greek islands of Samos, Chios, Lesvos, Leros and Kos. Out of those, 12,628 lived in the hotspots while the capacity of these centres was for 6,438. The number of refugees, asylumseekers and migrants staying in the Evros RIC was 366 while its capacity is for 318 people. Meanwhile, an estimated 16,457 refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants were living in 25 refugee camps in Greece’s mainland.

Find attached the rest of the report.