Demographic and clinical characteristics of refugees seeking primary healthcare services in Greece in the period 2015–2016: a descriptive study. By E. KAKALOU et al.

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Tuesday, July 10, 2018
Demographic and clinical characteristics of refugees seeking primary healthcare services in Greece in the period 2015–2016: a descriptive study. By E. KAKALOU et al.

Cite as: Kakalou, E., Riza, E., Chalikias, M., Voudouri, N., Vetsika, A., Tsiamis, C., Choursoglou, S., Terzidis, A., Karamagioli, E., Antypas, T. & Pikoulis, E., 2018. "Demographic and clinical characteristics of refugees seeking primary healthcare services in Greece in the period 2015–2016: a descriptive study", International Health 10 (6): 421-429doi.org/10.1093/inthealth/ihy042

Abstract

Background

In 2015–2016, more than a million refugees entered Greece. Along with other organizations, PRAKSIS, a local non-governmental organization, deployed mobile medical units on three islands and in temporary settlements in Athens.

Methods

This is a descriptive cross-sectional study aimed at analysing the demographic and clinical characteristics of the population (n=6688) that received services from PRAKSIS between October 2015 and June 2016 in different locations (islands of Samos, Kos and Leros in the southeastern Aegean Sea and on the mainland at Athens-Piraeus Port Gate E) before and after the closure of European borders in March 2016.

Results

The majority (88%) of the population came from Syria, Afghanistan and Iraq. Among them, 53% were women and children. Infectious diseases decreased as the population moved from the islands to the Athens-Piraeus Port, while all other disease categories increased in relative frequency, the difference being statistically significant (p<0.05). Among all consultations, dental and oral cavity health complaints also increased in the Athens-Piraeus Port, but failed to reach statistical significance (p=0.11). Referrals from the mobile health units to specialist care rose from 4.2% of all patients clinically examined on the islands to 9.9% in the Athens-Piraeus Port, and the difference was statistically significant (p<0.05).

Conclusions

More research and systematic data collection are needed to inform appropriate policies for the humanitarian challenges posed by the recent refugee and migrant waves in Europe.