Perspectives on the European Border Regime: Mobilization, Contestation, and the Role of Civil Society. By E. YOUKHANA & O. SUTTE (eds.)

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Tuesday, September 19, 2017
Perspectives on the European Border Regime: Mobilization, Contestation, and the Role of Civil Society. By E. YOUKHANA & O. SUTTE (eds.)

Cite as: Ove Sutter and Eva Youkhana (eds) 2017, Perspectives on the European Border Regime: Mobilization, Contestation, and the Role of Civil Society. Social Inclusion,  Volume 5, Issue 3

Abstract  
This issue examines politics and practices that challenge the European border regime by contesting and negotiating asylum laws and regulations, practices of separation in refugee camps and accommodation centers, as much as political acts by undocumented migrants and activists seeking alternative ways of cohabitation. The different contributions all highlight the role of civil society initiatives during the migration movements in 2015 and 2016 in Europe by discussing critical perspectives on the European border regime and by looking at migration as a contesting political force. Topics related to mobilization and the appropriation of public spaces to actively declare one’s solidarity, political activism to contest borders and boundary-making approaches (no border movements) and the engagement into voluntary work are critically reflected.
Table of contents of Social Inclusion Vol.5 Issue 3 :
 
Perspectives on the European Border Regime: Mobilization, Contestation and the Role of Civil Society | Eva Youkhana and Ove Sutter | 1–6
Feeling the Scope of Solidarity: The Role of Emotions for Volunteers Supporting Refugees in Germany | Serhat Karakayali | 7–16
The Myth of Apolitical Volunteering for Refugees: German Welcome Culture and a New Dispositif of Helping | Larissa Fleischmann and Elias Steinhilper | 17–27
Demand and Deliver: Refugee Support Organisations in Austria | Sara de Jong and Ilker Ataç | 28–37
Decolonial Perspectives on Charitable Spaces of “Welcome Culture” in Germany | Katherine Braun | 38–48
The Noborder Movement: Interpersonal Struggle with Political Ideals | Leslie Gauditz | 49–57
Under Control? Or Border (as) Conflict: Reflections on the European Border Regime | Sabine Hess and Bernd Kasparek | 58–68
Transnational Solidarity—Not Aid: The Perspective of Migration on the Hype about Migration&Development | Maria Schwertl | 69–76
Migration Regimes and the Translation of Human Rights: On the Struggles for Recognition of Romani Migrants in Germany | Jure Leko | 77–88